Nelson Zide
ERA Key Realty Services | 508-277-7794 | nelson@nelsonzide.com


Posted by Nelson Zide on 4/8/2020

Image by Susan Lowry Hare from Pixabay

Adirondack chairs are popular on decks and for outdoor living, though they also look great in a rustic living room or cabin!  Rather than being straight-backed and uncomfortable, their design make them a joy to sit in.  However, a finished Adirondack chair can up to $700 dollars, whereas materials will run you between $50 and $150 depending on the wood you choose to use. Check out how to make your very own Adirondack chair by following the instructions below.

Note: you will need a miter saw and a jigsaw to complete this project.

Materials

Lumber

  • One 2" x 2" x 6' footboard
  • Three 2" x 4" x 8' footboards
  • Four 1" x 4" x 8' footboards
  • Hardware

  • 2-inch screws
  • 2-inch deck screws
  • 4-inch deck screws
  • 1 1/2-inch deck screws or exterior screws
  • Other

  • Wood glue
  • Directions

    A) Cutting the planks to size

    1. For the stretcher boards
      Cut two 2 x 4s such that the long end measures 31 7/8".  One end should be cut to 20o off of square at the shortest point; the other end should be cut to 35off square at the longest point. Then, mark off 2" on the 20o square end and cut at a right angle (90o) to your 20o cut. 

      If you aren't sure how to measure a certain number of degrees off of square, check out this quick how-to here
    2. For the legs
      Cut two, 2" x 4" planks to 20 3/4".  Cut both ends parallel, 15o off square.  These will be the back legs.  For the front legs, cut two, 2" x 4" planks to 20" long.
    3. For the seat
      Cut five, 1" x 4" planks to 22 1/2".
    4. For the arms of the chair:
      Cut two, 1" x 4" planks to 27".
    5. For the arm rest support:
      Cut two, 2" x 2" planks to 26 1/2".  Cut one end at 15o off square.
    6. For the back support and front apron:
      Cut two2" x 4" planks to 22 1/2".
    7. For the back slats:
      Cut five1" x 4" planks to 36".
    8. For the top support section:
      Cut one, 1" x 4" board to 19 1/2".
    9. For the base support section:
      Cut one2" x 4" board to 19 1/2".

    B) Building the legs

    1. Using 2 1/2" deck screws, attach both back and front legs to an arm support, keeping the outside and top edges even.  Use clamps and wood glue for additional stability.
    2. Turn the front leg such that the arm support faces downward on your bench, and elevate off the bench using 2x4s.  Measure 13 3/4" from the base of your front leg on the left-hand side, and mark.  On the same leg, measure 1/2" horizontally and mark.   Line up your stretcher such that the 20o off of square side lines up with your two marked measurements.  The 35off square side should now line up to the base on the right.  Fix in place with 2 1/2" deck screws.  Use wood glue for additional stability.
    3. Repeat steps 1 and 2 to make your second leg.
    4. Using 2 1/2" deck screws and wood glue, attach the front apron such that it lines up with the stretcher board on each side.

    C) Making the seat

    Drill two pilot holes on each side of your seat slats, using a countersink bit to keep the wood intact.  Line up on the top of the stretcher and screw into place using the 2" screws, being sure to put a 1/2" gap between each slat.  Do not use wood glue on the seat slats; they will naturally move more than the rest of the chair.
    Note: it helps to lay out all the slats first, screwing in the outermost slats before the others and adjusting as you go, so that the spacing is right.

    D) Making the back

    1. Turn the chair upright with the back towards you.  You will note that the back support board is wider than width of the legs to which it must be affixed.  Attach the back support to both of the back legs at an angle, such that the distal side is pointed upward and the proximal side is pointed downward until flush with both sides.  Use 2 1/2" deck screws and wood glue to affix.
    2. Attach the back slats as you did the seat slats in Part C: 1/2" apart, using 2" screws at the base but with 1 1/4" exterior screws at the top.  Do not use wood glue on the slats, as they will naturally need a bit more flexibility.  
      Note: it helps to lay out all the slats first, screwing in the outermost slats before the others and adjusting as you go, so that the spacing is right.
    3. Using a bucket, trash bin, or other large, circular item as a guide, draw an arc at the top of your back slats.  Then, using your jigsaw, make the cut.
    4. Slide the finished back into place in your chair.  Secure with 2 1/2" deck screws.  Finally, screw the chair back into the back support with 2" deck screws.

    Finishing touches

    1. Finish the chair by screwing the armrests into the arm supports using 2" deck screws and wood glue, clamping into place.  
    2. After all your glue has cured as per the instructions on your wood glue, sand any jagged edges, particularly the top of the chair back.
    3. Finally, paint or spray with at least two coats of finish: a clear coat if you really like the look of your wood.





    Posted by Nelson Zide on 4/1/2020

    Photo by Gerd Altmann via Pixabay
     

    There are many fees and costs you’ll encounter as a homeowner. From closing costs that are due when first purchasing your home to your mortgage payment and property taxes, keeping up with these expenses is essential. But if you’re a homeowner that didn’t pay your property taxes, you’re at risk of losing your home in a tax sale. Keep reading to learn more about property tax liens and what to do if you have lost your property in this type of sale.

    What is a Tax Lien?

    If you fail to pay your property taxes or other municipal fees associated with your property like sewage or water bills, any past-due amount that you owe can become a lien on your home. Each state has its own laws regarding property tax liens but generally, if you have a lien on your home, the local government can sell the property to collect any monies owed.

    Can I Save My Home After a Tax Sale?

    Tax sales are a serious matter but there may be a few different options available to you to help save your home. It is possible to reclaim your home following a tax deed sale by setting aside the sale or redeeming it. Many jurisdictions offer a right of redemption that is available after the tax sale. TO redeem your property, you are required to reimburse the total amount paid at the sale, plus any interest to the purchaser. This must be done within a certain time frame, called the “redemption period,” which typically lasts from 1 to 3 years. Additionally, you may be able to redeem the property before the start of a sale.

    If you are unable to redeem the property, you may be able to invalidate or set aside the tax sale. This can be accomplished in a few ways, including:

    • Providing proof that there were defects in the tax lien
    • Identifying defects in the tax sale process
    • Proof that the tax in question was not owed or had been paid in full
    • Offering a good reason as to why the neglected fees were not paid

    Should I Hire an Attorney?

    If you are in a situation where a sale is imminent, or you’re exploring your legal options following a tax lien sale, you should consider working with an experienced attorney. Seeking legal counsel from a knowledgeable foreclosure attorney, tax attorney or real estate attorney may be able to stop or reverse a tax lien sale and help you to maintain ownership of your home.




    Categories: Uncategorized  


    Posted by Nelson Zide on 3/25/2020

    As incredible the act of purchasing a home is, many buyers end up regretting their purchase. Thereís a variety of reasons for this. It all comes down to being ill-informed about buying a home and the type of home needed for the most liable situation. Read on to find out some of the biggest regrets home buyers face and how to avoid them. 


    Buying Too Small Of A Home


    The most prominent regret that many buyers face is not buying a larger property. Many people want to live in a specific location or type of home that they overlook the size altogether. One reason that people end up buying a home thatís the wrong size is that they rush to find a property in a particular area. If you branch out on your search, youíll have a better shot at finding the right size home. The area might not matter as much as the space youíre living in, s keep that in mind. 


    Not Doing Your Research


    People tend to skip out on the research phase of buying a home. Itís critical that buyers understand things like mortgage rates, fees, credit reports, how much needs to be saved, and more. There are so many things that go into buying a home that you could easily miss out on something if you donít know what youíre in for ahead of time.


    Not Saving Enough


    Your home will be one of the largest purchases you make in your entire life. There is a lot more to the cost than just the monthly mortgage payment. Youíll need a lot of money upfront when you buy a home including a downpayment along with other closing costs and fees. Plus, youíll need to set some money aside for any repairs or replacements you need to do in the home once you move in. Itís also a good idea to have an emergency fund available just in case. Life happens, and you donít want your savings to be depleted because you bought a house. 


    Keep in mind that the bigger of a downpayment you make, the better off youíll be. Even if you can buy a home with a low downpayment, you want to put down as much as possible. A higher downpayment will keep your mortgage payments lower, get you a better rate, and you may even be able to avoid paying for PMI (private mortgage insurance.) Aim to save a 20 percent down payment for the most optimal mortgage situation.      

       




    Tags: Buying a home  
    Categories: Uncategorized  


    Posted by Nelson Zide on 3/18/2020

    With 24 hours before you finalize your home purchase, you might feel a mix of anxiety and excitement.

    What will it be like to finally own a home? How will the home closing process go? And what will I need to do to ensure everything goes seamlessly as you wrap up your home purchase? These are just some of the common questions that homebuyers consider in the hours leading up to a home closing.

    It is important to prepare as much as possible before you complete a home purchase. Lucky for you, we're here to help you do just that.

    Let's take a look at three tips that you can use to get ready to finish a home purchase.

    1. Get Your Paperwork in Order

    You may need multiple forms of identification and other essential documents when you close on a home. Thus, you should put together a folder of any must-have documents at least a day in advance.

    If you find that documents are missing, retrieve them as quickly as possible. Also, try to get multiple copies of important documents if you can.

    When it comes to getting ready for a home closing, it usually is better to over-prepare. Therefore, if you plan ahead as much as you can, you'll have all of the documents you need to complete the home closing process without delay.

    2. Finish Any Last-Minute Packing

    After you finalize a home purchase, you'll be ready to move in to your new home. As such, you should ensure that all of your belongings are packed up and ready to go.

    If you're vacating an apartment, ensure that you've notified your landlord and provided sufficient notice about your upcoming move. That way, you'll be able to finish your rental agreement on good terms with your landlord.

    Also, if you need extra help for your move, be sure to reach out to a moving company or family members and friends. And if you require a moving truck, don't forget to rent one in the days leading up to your move.

    3. Consult with Your Real Estate Agent

    The day before a home closing can be stressful, particularly for first-time homebuyers. If you have any concerns about the home closing process, be sure to consult with your real estate agent.

    Your real estate agent likely has been a life-saver throughout the homebuying process thus far and will continue to assist you in any way possible. If you have questions about the home closing cycle, your real estate agent will respond to your queries immediately.

    In addition, your real estate agent can teach you the ins and outs about what will happen before, during and after a home closing. He or she will explain what to look for during a final home walk-through, what home closing forms that you'll need to sign and what to expect after a home purchase.

    Streamline the home closing process Ė use these tips, and you can get take the guesswork out of finalizing a home purchase.




    Categories: Uncategorized  


    Posted by Nelson Zide on 3/16/2020

    Fantastic fifth floor unit overlooking the Foss Reservoir. Dining room has triple closets and is open to the living room with door to the balcony. Adjacent kitchen has plenty of cabinet space. King-sized master bedroom offers not only a lot of room but great closets and a master bathroom. Second bedroom is also quite large. Included is a coveted underground parking spot (extra $12/month and is included in the condo fee of $652). You'll enjoy all the amenities Chapel Hill East has to offer including the inground pool and fitness center plus all your utilities are paid for except for your cable and internet. Show and sell!

    More Info on this Property | New Listing Alerts







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