Nelson Zide
ERA Key Realty Services | 508-277-7794 | nelson@nelsonzide.com


Posted by Nelson Zide on 11/11/2020

Moving can be fun, exciting, and stressful all at the same time. With so many things happening and so much to keep track of, it can be easy to get overwhelmed.

 When youíre stressed and trying to multitask, thereís also an increased risk of personal injury and damaged belongings.

 While it may seem worth it to overlook safety in order to save time or money on moving day, itís important to remember that you and your familyís health and well-being is much more important than saving a few minutes or dollars.

 In this article, weíre going to give you a few simple moving day tips that will help keep you and your belongings safe so you can rest easy on the first night in your new home.

 Ask for help

Many moving day injuries result from one person attempting to lift, carry, or move items that really require more hands. Itís easy to see how this mistake is made. Everyone is busy with their own tasks, whether theyíre packing boxes or cleaning.

To avoid injury when lifting items, know your limits and always ask for help. If you donít feel comfortable moving heavy items, now is no time to push yourself--youíll be needed throughout the day, so depend on your family or hired movers.

Plan your route

Many damages and injuries occur when we havenít properly prepared. Know the terrain of the place youíll be carrying your items to. Plan ahead for the size of staircases, dangerous hills, or ruts in the ground. Put safety cones down in dangerous areas so no one is hurt or drops fragile items.

Load your truck wisely

Whether youíre moving far away or just a few blocks, a lot can go wrong once the truck starts moving. However, even if you donít have many fragile items inside, thereís the risk of boxes toppling on you and your family when unloading the truck if the boxes havenít been stacked wisely.

First, try to keep boxes lighter than what youíre comfortable carrying. Itís easier to move more boxes than to struggle with one particularly heavy one.

For heavier items, utilize equipment like dollies, hand trucks, and furniture sliders to protect you and your belongings.

Finally, practice smart loading and unloading techniques in your moving truck. Load the heaviest items (like appliances) first, and put lighter boxes on top of them. Think of loading like a game of Tetris--always aim for a strong foundation to stack on top of to avoid boxes falling on you or each other.

Take breaks

On moving day you may be on various deadlines, whether itís moving trucks or getting things unloaded before sunset. However, itís important that you take several breaks while loading and unloading, especially if youíre moving on a hot day.

First aid

Sometimes, even if you do everything right, mistakes can happen. Itís important to be prepared for when they do. Make sure you have a first aid kit in your moving truck that contains unexpired first aid supplies.

Be sure to have your cell phone handy and know the location of the nearest hospital in case of an emergency.

If you follow these tips, you should be on your way to having a successful, injury-free moving day.




Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Nelson Zide on 11/6/2019

Image by Irina from Unsplash

Whether you have young pets or older ones, there are certain household hazards to be aware of. Puppies and kittens can get into trouble while exploring different parts of your home out of curiosity. Adult dogs and cats can also end up getting hurt or sick from common household dangers for pets. Keep the following tips in mind to make your home as safe as possible for your pets.

Food Hazards

Some types of foods are toxic to dogs, cats or both. Chocolate, grapes, raisins, onions, garlic and macadamia nuts are among the foods that can make pets, especially dogs, seriously ill. You should store these foods out of your pet’s reach, and immediately pick up any that falls on the floor before your pet can get it.

Toxic Plants

Certain household plants and flowers can cause potentially life-threatening illnesses in dogs and cats if they ingest them. For example, lilies, amaryllis, daffodils, tulips and hyacinths are considered toxic to cats. For dogs, azaleas, irises, sago palms, begonias and philodendrons are among the plants that are considered toxic to dogs. You should avoid having these types of plants inside your home to lower the risk of your pet ingesting them. If you do have any plants that are toxic, you should keep them in an area that your pets can’t get to, such as high on a shelf or in a closed-off room.

Medications and Cleaning Products

Medications and cleaning products can make pets dangerously ill if they swallow or ingest them. You should store these items in cabinets that your pets can’t get into. Consider installing childproof latches on cabinets to prevent your pets from being able to open them.

Wires and Cords

These items can become strangulation hazards in your home, especially when you have curious pets around. Wires and cords also put pets at risk of electrical shock if they chew on them or play with them. Hide cords and wires out of reach of your pets, and use childproof window blind products to prevent your pets from playing with these types of cords.

String and Small Items

Dogs and cats can end up with serious injuries if they swallow pieces of string or small items, such as buttons. This can happen if they chew on clothes or get into sewing supplies. You can reduce this risk by keeping clothing items, shoes and craft supplies stored away in an area that your pets can’t reach. You should also check your rugs and furniture for strings or small items that might have fallen off clothes or other objects before your pets find them.




Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Nelson Zide on 3/14/2018

ďThe silent killer.Ē Itís a perplexing name for a common household hazard. Weíve all heard of the dangers of carbon monoxide, but few of us are taught exactly what causes CO poisoning.

Understanding the causes of CO poisoning are essential in reducing the risk that you or your family could be harmed by this poisonous gas. So, in this article weíll break down what exactly it is that carbon monoxide does to the body, where it can occur in the home, and how to protect yourself against it.

What is carbon monoxide?

Carbon monoxide is a tasteless, odorless, colorless, and poisonous gas. Because it is so dangerous to humans, fuels that emit carbon monoxide are usually mixed with other gases that do have an odor. This way, humans can typically smell gas and therefore be alerted that they are in danger.

What does CO do to the body?

When inhaled, carbon monoxide inhibits your bodyís ability to use oxygen. So, even though you are breathing in air, your body is still suffocating. As a result, the lack of oxygen caused by carbon monoxide poisoning can lead to death the same way that drowning does.

High levels of CO in the air can cause you to succumb within minutes. Your chest will tighten, youíll feel dizzy or drowsy and could suffocate if you donít get away from the area.

However, lower levels of CO exposure can also be dangerous. People often notice headaches, slight dizziness and muscle fatigue and mistake the symptoms for the flu.

People who are asleep can die from carbon monoxide poisoning without ever experiencing symptoms.

Where is CO found within the home?

Since carbon monoxide occurs from unburned fuels leaking in the air, there are a number of sources within and outside the home that emit carbon monoxide.

According to the American Lung Association, some common sources of carbon monoxide include:

  • Gas appliances (furnaces, ranges, ovens, water heaters, clothes dryers, etc.)

  • Fireplaces, wood stoves

  • Coal or oil furnaces

  • Space heaters or oil or kerosene heaters

  • Charcoal grills, camp stoves

  • Gas-powered lawn mowers and power tools

  • Automobile exhaust fumes

How to protect yourself from carbon monoxide poisoning

Luckily there are several ways to protect yourself from carbon monoxide poisoning. Knowing what causes it is the first and most important way. Preventing gas leaks in appliances and maintaining proper upkeep of those appliances is one important way.

Another tip to keep in mind is to make sure your home is well ventilated. If cooking for a long period of time, donít leave gas ranges unattended. If the knobs on your range are easily turned, make sure children and pets arenít left alone near the oven.

Never use items like kerosene lanterns, portable camping stoves, burning charcoal, or running engines inside your home or garage. Lack of ventilation can easily cause CO levels to rise to a dangerous level within minutes.

Common mistakes involving carbon monoxide include running lawnmowers or other gas-powered items inside a garage, or leaving a car running in a garage.

Finally, install a carbon monoxide detector in your house and garage. Change the batteries regularly and test the alarm often. If you smell gas in your home and canít identify the source immediately, open the windows and leave the house.







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